Complex Cardboard Columns Through Computational Architecture

michael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecture

Michael Hansmeyer is an architect and programmer currently based in Zurich who explores the use of algorithms and computation to generate architectural structures. He has created an algorithm that explores how subdivision can define and embellish the column order with an elaborate system of ornamentation. He has produced a full-scale, 2.7-meter high variant of the columns by use of layering with 1mm cardboard sheets, where each sheet is individually cut using a mill or laser. Sheets are then stacked and held together by poles that run through a common core. All I have to say is WOW!

michael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecturemichael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecturemichael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecture

“The calculation of the cutting path for each sheet takes place in several steps. First, the six million faces of the 3D model are intersected with a plane representing the sheet. This step generates a series of individual line segments that are tested for self-intersection and subsequently combined to form polygons. Next, a polygon-in-polygon test deletes interior polygons. A series of filters then ensures that convex polygons with peninsulas maintain a mininimum isthmus width. In a final step, an interior offset is calculated with the aim of hollowing out the slice to reduce weight.” — Michael Hansmeyer

michael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecturemichael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecturemichael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecturemichael hansmeyer complex cardboard columns through computational architecture

via Michael Hansmeyer

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